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Open Edition Prints - 4
Cherokee Dog Star Story Open Edition Print
Cherokee Dog Star Story

matted to 14" x 11"

Or “How the Milky Way came to be.” Something was stealing the Cherokee people’s meal at night. When they discovered giant dog prints around the house, an old man suggested that they meet the next night with noisemakers to scare off the dog. That night a huge dog appeared and began to eat great gulps of the meal. Everyone began to beat drums, shake rattles, and shout loudly—the old women shaking their brooms.
The dog was so scared that he made a great leap into the sky with the meal pouring out of his mouth making a white trail across the sky. It’s what we call the Milky Way, or what the Cherokee call “Where the dog ran.”

Exodus Open Edition Print
Exodus

matted to 14" x 11"

This piece shows a couple on the “Trail of Tears” which was the exodus of the Cherokee from their land in the southeast part of the United States to Oklahoma Territory. Nearly one-third of the people on the march died during this removal. This is reminiscent of the ledger art of the Plains Indians. When they were incarcerated on forts in the west, they were given old, used-up ledger books from the trading post to draw on. They recorded past hunting scenes, old and new battles, council meetings, and events happening on the fort. These images became very popular with collectors and remain an art form practiced by Plains artists today.
When a collector asked Jesse to create some “ledger art” he replied that it was not an art form of his people, the Cherokee, but he would try something original on his own. Thus, was born Jesse’s originals on music—and other paper memorabilia

Exodus Into Indian Territory Open Edition Print
Exodus Into Indian Territory

matted to 11" x 14"

This piece shows a group of people on the “Trail of Tears” which was the exodus of the Cherokee from their land in the southeast part of the United States to Oklahoma Territory. Nearly one-third of the people on the march died during this removal. The original was painted on a 1905 of Oklahoma and Indian Territory.
This is reminiscent of the ledger art of the Plains Indians. When they were incarcerated on forts in the west, they were given old, used-up ledger books from the trading post to draw on. They recorded past hunting scenes, old and new battles, council meetings, and events happening on the fort. These images became very popular with collectors and remain an art form practiced by Plains artists today.
When a collector asked Jesse to create some “ledger art” he replied that it was not an art form of his people, the Cherokee, but he would try something original on his own. Thus, was born Jesse’s originals on music—and other paper memorabilia

Three Moons & a Rez Hog Open Edition Print
Three Moons & a Rez Hog

matted to 11" x 14"

“For all the ‘baby boomers’ and their new motorcycles. This motorcycle is a combination of a Harley, Indian, and Yamaha motorcycle-brands that Jesse’s friends are now riding. Here’s a Native American riding the ultimate reservation cycle.”

Devils Tower Open Edition Print
Devils Tower

matted to 14" x 11"

This depicts the Kiowa legend of how Devil’s Tower in northeast Wyoming was formed. While the Kiowa were still a Nomadic people, they camped near this site. Some little girls were playing nearby in the grass. Suddenly bears began chasing them and they ran to and got on top of a small rock. As the bears came closer the rock began to grow upward to keep the girls out of reach of the bears. As the bears climbed the rock, they left scratches on the rock that can still be seen today—and are shown in the painting. To keep the bears from reaching the girls, the rock grew so tall that the girls were unable to get down and the floated into the sky to become the Pleiades constellation also called the Seven Sisters.
With the naked eye in most places, only six of the seven stars in the Pleiades can be seen. The top of Devil’s Tower is the only place where all seven stars can be seen all the time. To show this Jesse has six of the seven sisters holding on to the seventh smaller, weaker one that forms the constellation.

Falling Star Story Open Edition Print
Falling Star Story

matted to 14" x 11"

This story (probably Ojibwa) tells of children who not obey their parents and go off dancing in the mountains. Their parents did not approve of the new dances because the weren’t traditional and would ask their children to come home and forsake the new dances. But the children refused and stayed in the mountains dancing and dancing until they became weak from hunger and thirst. The parents finally decided to go to the mountains to take them food and drink. But when they got there the children were so weightless from hunger that they had floated up to the sky and became stars. The parents pleaded with them to return to earth, but they remained as starts. However, when the children get homesick and decide to return to earth, they become falling stars.

Red Pony Boy Open Edition Print
Red Pony Boy

matted to 11" x 14"

This comes from the Swedish tradition of giving small red wooden horses (Dala horse) to friends and family as a token of goodwill. Jesse was given by a friend in LA. One of his American Indian friends was a stunt man in the movies, so here he is showing off his prowess as a rider by standing on the back of the pony while counting coup on a falling star.

The Eagle has Landed Open Edition Print
The Eagle has Landed

matted to 14" x 11"

Jesse used a little play on words for this piece. He shows an eagle dancer with traditional wing span and eagle whistle dancing on the moon...and used the famous space quote for the title.

The Family Open Edition Print
The Family

matted to 14" x 11"

A first attempt to print a piece of 'ledger' book art created by Jesse. The original piece was painted on a page from a ledger book given to Jesse from a customer in Virginia. The book was from a hardware store and dates ranged from 1841 to 1854.
This piece shows a family in a pose that shows they protect each other as all families do. The page is from entries made in 1851... as seen at the top.
This is reminiscent of the ledger art of the Plains Indians. When they were incarcerated on forts in the west, they were given old, used-up ledger books from the trading post to draw on. They recorded past hunting scenes, old and new battles, council meetings, and events happening on the fort. These images became very popular with collectors and remain an art form practiced by Plains artists today.
He has done specific commissioned pieces on stock certificates, deeds, and maps. Now he has expanded this series to other items—especially maps, old journal pages and even some ledger paper given to him by Plains friends.

Wild Hummers Open Edition Print
Wild Hummers

matted to 8" x 10"

One in Jesse’s series of hummingbirds. The green background represents the green of nature where the hummingbirds can be wild. Hearts of course show love.

Wild Hummers Open Edition Print
Quilt Hummers

matted to 8" x 10"

I had a special request to do this piece. I used quilt patterns as the background for my stylized hummingbirds.

Wild Hummers Open Edition Print
Rt 66

matted to 8" x 10"

This is Jesse's original piece of his Route 66 series done for his one-man show “Oklazona” at Sharlot Hall Museum in 2009. It features his version of a 1949 Studebaker in front of a fictional Big Chief Indian store-with its proud new owners--somewhere along Route 66.

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